Pain is good. Yes, you read that right

August 29, 2017

 

 

 

You probably disagree with the title of this blog, but let me explain before you jump to conclusions.

 

Most people view pain as a negative experience, and to be fair, they’re right. It is. But that’s because pain is designed that way. Pain is supposed to get your attention, supposed to make you feel uncomfortable. Your body does this because it’s telling you something is wrong (or perceiving that there is a potential threat to your health), at least most of the time, we’ll get to the special cases in a later blog.

 

Pain is your bodies warning system, it tells you that something is wrong and that you need to fix it. So in reality pain is a protection mechanism, but also a self-improvement tool. For example, when you touch something hot. The receptors in your hand tell you that there is energy in the form of heat entering your hand, too much energy going in and a pain response is elicited, causing you to take your hand away from the heat, preventing burns.

 

But pain also works in many different situations, take a football player that has injured themselves. Pain stops them from playing further, lets them know that something is wrong and that they need to fix it, rather than playing on and doing further damage.

 

Osteopaths then take this one step further. We like to find the answers to questions like, what caused the pain in the first place? And how do we prevent that from being an issue again? These questions allow us to reach the root cause of the problem, which can then be addressed with the relevant treatment methods, interventions and treatment plans. So you see how pain can be used as a tool to improve yourself, even if it may require a little outside help.

 

Pain also plays a huge role in the beginning of the healing process. Some of the chemicals released when pain is felt can also positively influence and speed up the healing mechanism. So without it, you might not get better at all!

 

There is a condition known as Congenital Insensitivity to Pain (CIP). People with CIP don't feel any pain whatsoever, which may sound like a good thing. It's not. Think about how often you hurt yourself, even slightly. Cuts, bruises etc all go unnoticed, but so do things like burning heat. As you can imagine, this leads to the person who feels no pain hurting themselves more severely and more often than most people. Without this self preservation and improvement mechanism, they are at a much higher risk of premature death. Thankfully this condition is very rare, but it serves as a good reminder of how essential pain is.

 

So, next time you feel a bit of back pain, be thankful that it's there. It's your body telling you something has gone wrong, and that you need to do something about it!

 

But also remember, pain does not always mean harm... We'll explain this in future blogs, so keep an eye out! For now though, have a look at our blog about chronic pain

 

If you're currently in pain and want to get rid of it, call us on 02083047237 and we'll be happy to help you recover.

 

 

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